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Author Biography

Rousiley C. M. Maia, Ph.D. in Political Science (University of Nottingham, UK), is a Professor of Political Communication in the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. She is the author of Deliberation across Deeply Divided Societies (with J. Steiner, M. C. Jaramillo, and S. Mameli, Cambridge University Press, 2017), Recognition and the Media (2014, Palgrave McMillan), Deliberation, the Media and Political Talk (2012, Hampton Press). Some of her recent publications have appeared in European Political Science Review, Political Studies, Journal of Computer-mediated Communication, Journal of Communication, Representation, Journal of Political Power, Journal of Public Deliberation, and in several Brazilian journals.

Danila G. R. Cal, Ph.D. in Communication Studies (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil), is an Assistant Professor at the Federal University of Pará. Her master’s thesis, which focused on public discourses regarding child domestic workers, received several awards in 2008. Her Ph.D. dissertation was awarded the Compós Prize, National Association of Graduate Programs in Communication in 2014. She is an associate research in the Research Group EME/UFMG. She is the author of the book Comunicação e Trabalho Infantil Doméstico: política, poder, resistências and her recent publications have appeared in Journal of Political Power, Galáxia, Fronteiras, E-Compós.

Janine K. R. Bargas is a Ph.D. student in Communication Studies the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. She has experience in projects about traditional communities and human rights. She is an associate research in the Research Group EME/UFMG. Her dissertation is about digital media and political organization of Quilombolas communities. Some of her publications have appeared in Bulletin of Human Sciences of the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi and Logos.

Vanessa V. Oliveira is a Ph.D. Candidate in Communication Studies at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. She was a Fulbright visiting scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, U.S., under the supervision of Jürg Steiner. She was a junior researcher at National Truth Commision of Brazil. Her master thesis on the media controversy regarding the human rights policy in Brazil received an award from the Brazilian Association of Political Communication (Compolítica). She is an associate research in the Research Group EME/UFMG. Some of her recent publications have appeared in Information Journal of Communication , Galáxia, Compolítica.

Patricia G. C. Rossini, Ph.D. in Communication Studies (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil), is a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University, USA, where she collaborates with the Center for Computational and Data Sciences. Patricia is also an associate researcher in the Media and Public Sphere Research Group (EME/UFMG). Her work has appeared in books such as the Handbook of Research on Advanced ICT Integration for Governance and Policy Modeling (2014), A Digital Janus (2014); Navigating Cybercultures (2013), International Journal of Communication, and in several Brazilian journals.

Rafael C. Sampaio, Ph.D. in Communication Studies, is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science in the Federal University of Paraná. He is an associate research in the Research Group EME/UFMG. His writings have appeared in the Journal of Community Informatics, Journal of Latin American Communication Research, Brazilian Political Science Review, and in several Brazilian journals.

Abstract

The notion of equality is central to public deliberation, but few researches have examined how participants construct interactions in face-to-face group discussion involving unequal conditions of authority. This study analyses discussion between slum residents and police officers in Brazil, focusing on both reciprocal and hierarchical relationships in the flow of deliberation. It contributes to explain that the expression of authority is far from straightforward. Looking at a range of authority sources (expertise, functional position, tradition, life experience) that serve to situate and re-situate participants in relation to each other in discussion dynamics helps clarifying what goes on in deliberative moments. Findings reveal that personal experiences prevail in deliberative moments whereas functional credentials predominate in non-deliberative ones. Yet, the case demonstrates that functional authority is not necessarily dominative but can be combined with certain behaviors (such as empathetic imagination, search for commonalities and self-criticism) that lead to reciprocal interactions. This study provides important insights for organizing deliberation more effectively in contexts of fear, mistrust and resentment.

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